Curated by Barkandji woman Zena Cumpston, Emu Sky endeavours to forefront and illuminate Aboriginal voices and perspectives. Centred around explorations of Aboriginal knowledge, science, language and land management practice, Emu Sky refers to the dark nebulae that appears in the night sky in the shape of an emu across Southeastern Australia and beyond. This feature in the sky is central to ecological, spiritual and cultural practices of many diverse Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups across Australia and tells a powerful story of the importance of Indigenous knowledge of Country, as well as demonstrating how this knowledge is held and transmitted.

Through detailed research, art and storytelling this exhibition is a sustained interrogation of the western lens through which Aboriginal scientific endeavour has been historically perceived. The Emu Sky exhibition tells its stories through art, with more than 30 Aboriginal community members coming together to share their culture, knowledge and artistic practice.

Opening hours:
Tuesday – Friday 10am to 4pm
Saturday 11am to 4pm

The exhibition is a collaboration between CAUL Hub, Science Gallery Melbourne and Ian Potter Museum of Art. Open now and free to visit at Old Quad on University of Melbourne’s Parkville Campus.